Apple’s iOS Update Will Change Facebook Advertising

iOS changes that will affect Facebook Advertising

Earlier this year at the annual Worldwide Developers' Conference, Apple announced product and policy changes that will affect how data is shared across iOS. Unfortunately, the limits this change places on advertising will disrupt the growth of small businesses and the free internet.

Don’t get us wrong, we are all for proactive privacy measures and data transparency. We believe in a world where personalisation and user privacy can coexist. In saying this, we aren’t too happy about the policies Apple is bringing in.

What will change

The new iOS 14 update will force people to opt-in for their data to be tracked on their mobile device and across the web. By opting out, Apple’s proposed changes will limit your ability to effectively reach, understand and engage people on their mobile devices and across the web. This will disrupt how you control who sees your ads, understand performance of your campaigns and draw insights of user behaviour. Overtime, you may see an overall decrease in ad performance and personalisation and an increase in cost per action.

Specifically, these changes will limit your ability to:

  • “Effectively deliver ads to people based on their engagement with your business”
  • “Measure and report on conversions from certain customers”
  • “Ensure that your ads are delivered to the most relevant audiences at the right frequency”
  • “Accurately attribute app installs to people using iOS 14 and later”
  • “Predict and optimise cost per action over time and efficiently allocate budgets” (Facebook, 2020)

 

In summary

The changes to policy in the iOS 14 update will make it harder for small businesses to reach their target audience. This limits growth and ability to compete against the bigger players. It’s important to note that Facebook advertising isn’t (and shouldn’t be) the only driving force for selling online, gathering leads, building brand awareness. It is essential to create integrated campaigns across multiple platforms so that messages reach consumers in many areas of the life, not just online.

What you can do to get ready for the change

If you plan to deliver as for conversion events on your website (you can read more about this here), you may need to verify your website's domain to avoid future disruptions. Domain verification should be prioritised for domains with pixels used by multiple businesses and personal ad accounts. If you plan to deliver ads for conversion events that occur within your business apps, follow these steps.

An if you’d like to read more about these changes, visit this blog post from Facebook, explaining the iOS policy changes in-depth.

 

Make your Facebook Ads perform like never before

When people talk about how to set up Facebook Ads, they have previously attributed success to targeting (that’s your audiences). Yes, nailing your Audience is very important as you should always be communicating with consumers who are interested and in need of your product or service. But, with Facebook comes something no other advertising channel allows: Conversion Optimisation. AKA, targeting people who are most likely to take actions in the consumer funnel.

Facebook doesn’t show your ad to every person on your audience. Your ads are only shown to a small segment of that audience. Knowing this, you’d want that segment of the audience who are shown the ad to be the most interested, and actionable consumers… so you can make more sales. With Conversion Optimisation, you can make sure your ads are served to these people.

So how does it work?

Essentially, Facebook has so much data on each individual user, that it is now possible to target people based on how they are predicted to act when served your ad. When you set up a Facebook ad, you can now tell Facebook to optimise your ad for ‘Add to Cart’ clicks or ‘Initiate checkout’ clicks, even ‘Purchase’ clicks. So, with a defined, targeted audience, and optimisation for conversion you’re well on your way to a successful Facebook ad campaign.

We've seen Conversion Optimisation work before our very own eyes!

Trust us, we have seen how tweaking conversion optimisation has completely turned a Facebook campaign around. We ran a Facebook campaign for a client whose aim was to make more online sales. In setting up the campaign, we initially selected the goal ‘Traffic’ and directed consumers to the product page on their client’s website. We’d selected this goal, because we wanted to drive much traffic to the website as possible. But we didn’t consider if that traffic would be likely to purchase. After a few days, we’d only had one sale, and so we investigated what we could do better. Then we found this article about ad optimisation. After tweaking the campaign to have the goal ‘Conversions’, and to be optimised for the ‘Add to cart’ conversion event, 70+ orders were placed within a week. We were amazed with the result of a simple tweak.

So, now that you’re convinced Conversion Optimisation is going to be your new best-friend, let’s dive into how to set up ads that will make your money well worth it.

Set up your Campaign with the goal ‘Conversions’

If you’re selling product online, then set up your Facebook campaign with the goal ‘Conversions’. This is the very first decision you make about your campaign, and you’ll need to make sure your Facebook Pixel is connected to your website in order for this type of goal to work. On a side note, here is how to create and add a Facebook Pixel to your website.

 

Facebook Campaign for Conversions Goal
Choose your Conversion Event

Now that your campaign is set up for conversions, you’ll need to select a conversion event in the Ad Set. This is a certain action a consumer takes on their path to purchasing a product and works alongside the Consumer Funnel (a nifty marketing model we still use all the time). The conversion event is where you’ll choose what action you want your audience to take.

Facebook Ad Conversion Event Selection

Now, generally speaking, we’d want people to purchase your product, so choosing the event ‘Purchase’ seems obvious. Well, actually, you’ll miss a heap of people who might be interested in your product by selected such a small segment. Referring to the Consumer Funnel below, you’ll see that at each ‘conversion event’ you move through you lose consumers along the way. Hence, the upside-down triangle, indicative of the market size for each event.

Consumer Funnel

If you’re looking to reach a lot of interested people (and especially if this is your first-time advertising on Facebook), choose either ‘Leads’ or ‘Add to Cart’. If you are running a retarget ad, you’ll want to choose an event further down the Consumer Funnel, because you know they already are interested in what you are selling. Facebook’s rule of thumb is that you need to select an event that is being completed at least 15-25 times a week. Why? Because Facebook uses the data from goal completions to help place your ad in front of consumers who are predicted to act in the same way.